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Pastoral wisdom


In the past months, while I have been savouring my pastoral work, as one of the chaplains at Mater Dei Hospital, I was also blessed by the company of the autobiography of Saint John XXIII, Journal of a soul. The more I leafed through it the more I found some priceless insights that really healed me as a priest.

Today I want to share with you what this great and humble Pope wrote during his retreat in preparation for the completion of his eightieth year of his life at Castel Gandolfo. The entry’s date is that of Sunday 13 August 1961. In this entry, Pope Roncalli reflected on the practice of prudence by the Pope and the Bishops. Although he is writing on the Pope and the Bishops what he is saying applies very well to us priests. Thus he wrote:

“It is very important to insist that that all the Bishops (priests) should act in the same way: May the Pope’s example be a lesson and an encouragement to them all. The Bishops (priests) are exposed to the temptation of meddling immoderately in matters that are not their concern, and it is for this reason that the Pope (Bishop) must admonish them not to take part in any political or controversial question and not to declare for one section or faction rather than another. They are to preach to all alike, and in general terms, justice, charity, humility, meekness, gentleness and the other evangelical virtues, courteously defending the rights of the Church when these are violated or compromised.

But at all times and especially just now, the Bishop (priest) must apply the balm of sweetness to the wounds of mankind. He must beware of making any rash judgment or uttering any abusive words about anyone, or letting himself be betrayed into flattery by threats, or in any way conniving with evil in the hope that by so doing he may be useful to someone; his manner must be grave, reserved and firm, while in his relations with others he must always be gentle and loving, yet at the same time always ready to point out what is good and what is evil, with the help of sacred doctrine but without any vehemence.

… He must with more assiduous and fervent prayer earnestly seek to promote divine worship among the faithful, with religious practices, frequent use of the sacraments, well taught and well administered, and above all he must encourage religious instructions because this also will help to solve problems of the merely temporal order, and do so much better than ordinary human measures can”.

In these enlightening paragraphs, Saint John XXIII is sharing with us priests what he deemed as his pastoral thoughts and care minister of God should cultivate towards Christ’s flock. In front of these powerful reflections, it is apt that we priests make the following questions personally:

First, as a priest, am I meddling too much in political matters or controversial questions, thus siding with one section and setting myself against another? In my preaching am I concentrating on the evangelical virtues of justice, charity, humility, meekness, gentleness and so forth? Am I speaking up for the Church’s right to express her vision for the world and society? Am I applying the balm of sweetness to the wounds of people I come across? Am I on my toes in order not to make rush judgment or saying abuse words or not letting anyone derailing my pastoral journey by his or her threats? Am I firm in living the principles concerning God’s love and neighbour yet being loving and gentle with the people I meet? Am I ready to correct with the help of God’s Word and the Church’s teaching with a persuasive gentleness? Do I pray fervently as a priest? Do I promote the liturgy among God’s people? Do I prepare the faithful to receive the Church’s sacraments by a sound catechesis? How much am I convinced of my duty to teach the faithful? Do I realize that the Christian faith help my fellow Christians to live their humanity to the full?

No wonder why Saint John XXIII concluded this entry by commenting: “This will draw down divine blessing on the people, preserving them from many evils and recalling minds that have strayed from the right path”.

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